Home Movies Documentary Videofreex: The pioneers of citizen or social media journalism

Videofreex: The pioneers of citizen or social media journalism

In the 1960s, long before cellphone videos turned everyone into citizen journalists, a group of young idealists captured political and social upheaval on newly available portable video cameras. Their story is the focus of a new documentary and exhibition.

Long before cellphone videos turned everyone into citizen journalists…

A bunch of young idealists called the Video-freex captured political and social upheaval, on newly available portable video cameras.

It was the late sixties and they used their guerilla-style footage to offer alternative viewpoints to that of the mainstream media.

Now a documentary, ‘Here Come the Video-Freex’ has been released, charting their story.

The founders met while interviewing the crowds at Woodstock in 1969.

Then a short time later, they were recruited by CBS News, to cover the nations counter-culture movement.

Many issues were covered including abortion and the anti war protests of 1971, in which 10-thousand people were arrested including Davidson Gigliotti of the Videofreex

The Videofreex also interviewed Black Panther leader Fred Hampton shortly before his death in a police raid in 1969.

Jenny Raskin, who co-directed the film with Jon Nealon, lauded the group as pioneers.

They spent years restoring about a-hundred tapes, from more than a-thousand that were in varying states of disrepair.

Eventually CBS pulled the plug on the Video-freex.

And between 1971 and 178, they lived and worked on a farm in upstate New York, where they launched the nations first pirate TV station.

Along with the film, an exhibition called ‘Videofreex: The Art of Guerrilla Television is showing at the Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art at the State University of New York.

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